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Supervisors introduce county parks and rec ‘Tour Our Trails’ challenge

The 15 trails range from easy, moderate, to tough. Supervisor Gaspar with Supervising Park Ranger Tim Leon.

Wednesday, July 1, Supervisor Kristin Gaspar, Supervisor Jim Desmond and County Parks and Recreation staff unveiled the “Tour Our Trails” challenge. It is designed to encourage County residents to visit County parks and explore different trails.

The challenge was launched before the July 4th holiday weekend to encourage safe, socially distant, outdoor recreation. The 15 trails range from easy, moderate, to tough and can be accessed on foot, bike and on horseback. Snap a selfie at each landmark and track your progress in your challenge passport. There is a prize for completing each category and completing all 15 trails will earn a special limited-edition patch.

“The County has so many unique parks, from San Elijo Lagoon on the coast to the breathtaking peaks of the Volcan Mountain Wilderness Preserve,” said Supervisor Gaspar. “I hope the healthy competition will motivate people to try something new.”

“During these unprecedented times, outdoor recreation remains a safe way to spend time with family and friends,” said Supervisor Desmond. “We hope this new challenge can be fun for the whole family to enjoy.”

The unveiling of this challenge coincides with National Parks and Recreation month. The passport will be available at park locations throughout San Diego County and online soon. For more information visit www.sdparks.org/content/sdparks/en/news- events/news-stories/AWinningWaytoTourTrails.html

Supervisor Kristin Gaspar along the Los Peñasquitos trail with Supervising Park Ranger Tim Leon.

Third District Supervisor Kristin Gaspar introducing the “Tour Our Trails” challenge Wednesday, July 1 at the Los Peñasquitos Trailhead.

One response to “Supervisors introduce county parks and rec ‘Tour Our Trails’ challenge”

  1. Tami Ridley says:

    Can any of these trails be accessed by wheelchair users? I use a wheelchair and love to be able to enjoy nature and engage in activity that encourages fitness and wellness. I enjoy being able to participate and be part of the community. Without access, we are excluded.

    People with disabilities are at the highest risk of developing secondary conditions such as obesity, diabetes, hypertension, etc. that lead to death. Those using wheelchairs are at the highest risk. Having access to places and spaces to be physical active help to prevent some secondary conditions.

    Due to the lack of accessible places to be physically active (e.g., sidewalks, parks, fitness centers, green spaces), individuals with disabilities are more likely to be less physically active than people without disabilities. Engaging in regular physical activity is one of the most important things that people of all ages and abilities can do to improve their health, well-being, and quality of life. Although the causes of obesity are diverse and complex, lack of accessible places to be physically active, combined with other food access factors (e.g., difficulty preparing and shopping for healthy foods), create additional barriers for people with disabilities. Having access to places and spaces to be physical active may also help to prevent some secondary conditions. Consequently, when public spaces— schools, offices, healthcare facilities, and parks—are built, they should be designed using the Universal Design14 principles so they can be used by all people, regardless of age and ability.

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