Escondido, CA
Mostly cloudy
Mostly cloudy
53°F
 

“No On Newland Sierra” referendum set for March 2020 ballot

The San Diego County Board of Supervisors this week voted to put the “No on Newland Sierra” referendum on the March 2020 ballot, giving San Diego voters the final say on whether to amend the County’s General Plan to allow the Newland Sierra project that the board previously approved. 

Supervisors had the option of rescinding the General Plan Amendment which allows for the project, but voted 4-0, with Supervisor Ron Roberts absent, to put the General Plan Amendment on the ballot for a public vote at the next regular scheduled election in March 2020.

“This is a win for San Diego County voters,” said Tony Eason, a community leader and resident of Deer Springs Oaks. “San Diegans know bad development when we see it, and now it will be up to voters to make a choice on how San Diego will grow.”

Easton added, “When the Board of Supervisors approved a General Plan Amendment in September 2018 to allow the Newland Sierra project, a coalition of County residents and public interest groups gathered more than 117,000 signatures on a petition to refer that action to a vote of the people. Last month the Registrar of Voters validated the petition signatures and confirmed that enough voters signed the referendum to qualify it for the ballot.”

The Newland Sierra project is located in a very high fire danger zone as designated by the County. This drew opposition from the Twin Oaks Valley Sponsor Group, Bonsall Sponsor Group, Hidden Meadows Sponsor Group, Endangered Habitats League, California Native Plant Society, Center for Biological Diversity, Sierra Club, and numerous community leaders and organizations. Similar projects in the same location were rejected on two previous attempts.

Rita Brandin, Vice President, Newland Communities, commented on the board’s action and the upcoming campaign over the next two years.  “We are looking forward to engaging the voters leading up to the 2020 election and sharing with them the facts about Newland Sierra.  

“They will be presented with a very clear choice: Do they prefer Sierra, a thoughtfully-planned residential community with attainably-priced homes and an open space preserve the size of Balboa Park? Or would they rather back the County’s outdated General Plan, which calls for a massive big box commercial and office development the size of nearly two Westfield North County shopping malls, as well as 99 large estate homes that only the very wealthy can afford?”

Brandin concluded, “When given the facts, we believe they will choose homes and open space over a massive big box development, which would bring more peak time traffic to the I-15 corridor than Sierra.”

2 responses to ““No On Newland Sierra” referendum set for March 2020 ballot”

  1. Steve says:

    I have read the EIR for this development and attended many local and county meetings, and can say first hand that everything that Rita Brandon says is a self serving lie. This development has been enacted through some serious Backdoor dealings between the BIA and local government using shady business practices. The BIA filled the county building with pro developers who work for construction firms to push all local opposition into other chambers to watch the processes on a tv. They only advertise what’s going on with the development in Areas of San Diego that are far away from the impacted area. They only tell their yes crowd where the PR events are to give the appearance that there is little to no opposition to this. They have used government offices to bend local and federal rules to make themselves a snowflake that is immune to all things that govern development in San Diego. Let’s get one thing clear they are setting a huge precedent here if they go through. It will be the shining star template for all large developments to use to get away with whatever they want regardless of what the citizens or general plan have to say about it. If the people of San Diego do not shut down this development it will single handedly destroy two different wildlife protection plans for San Diego, the general plan we paid millions to make, it will destroy the I15 corridor from the 79 to poway road daily, it will increase utility fees for everyone (since their acres of parks and facilities will be water using clean fresh water instead of grey water because it’s unavailable anywhere near the project site), it will destroy the school enrollment limits of San Marcos and Escondido schools, it will put the population density of Del Mar on local roads they never studied nor offered to improve. The list is honestly massive, and involves the permanent destruction of the habitat for 3 different federally endangered species. So the question for San Diego at the ballot box is do you support the destruction of the character of the county so that a company can make billions and leave the problems for the taxpayers, or shut the building industry down and make them abide by the laws we have for governing these large mega developments and where they belong.

    FYI they could not build that much box retail it would take part of the I15 to make possible because the project site is located on a majority of sheer unbuild ale cliffs and mountainous terrain. Their development will already be infilling 3 hover dams worth of material to build it.

  2. Steve says:

    I have read the EIR for this development and attended many local and county meetings, and can say first hand that everything that Rita Brandon says is a self serving lie. This development has been enacted through some serious Backdoor dealings between the BIA and local government using shady business practices. The BIA filled the county building with pro developers who work for construction firms to push all local opposition into other chambers to watch the processes on a tv. They only advertise what’s going on with the development in Areas of San Diego that are far away from the impacted area. They only tell their yes crowd where the PR events are to give the appearance that there is little to no opposition to this. They have used government offices to bend local and federal rules to make themselves a snowflake that is immune to all things that govern development in San Diego. Let’s get one thing clear they are setting a huge precedent here if they go through. It will be the shining star template for all large developments to use to get away with whatever they want regardless of what the citizens or general plan have to say about it. If the people of San Diego do not shut down this development it will single handedly destroy two different wildlife protection plans for San Diego, the general plan we paid millions to make, it will destroy the I15 corridor from the 79 to poway road daily, it will increase utility fees for everyone (since their acres of parks and facilities will be water using clean fresh water instead of grey water because it’s unavailable anywhere near the project site), it will destroy the school enrollment limits of San Marcos and Escondido schools, it will put the population density of Del Mar on local roads they never studied nor offered to improve. The list is honestly massive, and involves the permanent destruction of the habitat for 3 different federally endangered species. So the question for San Diego at the ballot box is do you support the destruction of the character of the county so that a company can make billions and leave the problems for the taxpayers, or shut the building industry down and make them abide by the laws we have for governing these large mega developments and where they belong.

    FYI they could not build that much box retail it would take part of the I15 to make possible because the project site is located on a majority of sheer unbuildable cliffs and mountainous terrain. Their development will already be infilling 3 hover dams worth of material to make it buildable.

Leave a Reply to Steve Cancel reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *